Publications

Abstract
Introduction: Complications associated with blood donation significantly lower odds of subsequent donations. The aim of the study is to assess the prevalence of complications related to blood donation, identify the influencing factors, and come up with suggestions for minimizing discomfort to donors and making outdoor voluntary blood donation camps safer. Materials and Methods: This study covered 181 blood donation camps organized by Sankalp India Foundation where 16 blood banks participated from 01-04-2011 to 01-08-2014 in Karnataka. Uniform protocols for donor selection, predonation preparation, counseling, postdonation care, and refreshments were used. The postdonation complications were recorded on a form immediately, after they were observed. Results: We observed 995 (3.2%) complications in 30,928 whole blood donations. Of these 884 (2.86%) mild, 77 (0.25%) moderate, and 5 (0.02%) severe complications were observed. Local symptoms (blood outside vessels, pain, and allergy) contributed 1.0%, and generalized symptoms (vasovagal reaction) contributed 2.2% to all the complications. Conclusion: We observed 322 complications for every 10,000 donations. Since 27 out of every 10000 experience moderate and severe complication, the readiness to manage complications is crucial. Women donors, young donors, and donors with a lower weight are at a significantly greater risk of experiencing complications, highlighting the need for specific guidelines for the management of higher risk donor groups. Complications varied significantly between various blood banks. Predonation hydration was effective in limiting complications with generalized symptoms. We recommend a robust donor hemovigilance program for voluntary blood donation for monitoring complications and enable assessment of effectiveness and implementation of appropriate interventions.
Year of Publication
2016
Journal
Asian Journal of Transfusion Medicine
Volume
10
Start Page
53
Issue
1
Pagination
53-58
Date Published
02/2016
Type of Article
Original Article
URL
http://www.ajts.org/text.asp?2016/10/1/53/165840
DOI
10.4103/0973-6247.165840
Abstract
The Sankalp India Foundation is a non-profit organisation, which has been running a rare blood group network (www.bombaybloodgroup.org) with the voluntary participation of blood banks, individuals with Bombay blood group (BBG), specialists in transfusion medicine and volunteers. The national network aims at making rare blood available when needed, promoting use of alternatives to transfusion, as well as building a rare blood group donor registry and preventing wastage of blood. We would like to share our experience with running the network from 1/07/2012 to 31/03/2014. We created a customised web-based application for the network. Individuals with BBG were invited to enrol. Blood banks were asked to post the availability of BBG units. Hospitals, blood banks and patients' families were asked to post blood requests. Trained volunteers coordinated the network and ensured that adequate provisioning of blood was done for every patient.

From 1/07/2012 to 31/03/2014, 117 BBG-positive and 16 BBG-negative donors registered on the network, out of which 49% were willing donors from nine different states. Blood banks reported the availability of 40 units. Of the 40 reported units, 14 expired, mainly because the blood banks communicated their availability within a week of the date of expiry. Requests were received from 11 states and 35 districts.
Year of Publication
2015
Journal
Blood Transfusion
Start Page
89
Pagination
89-90
Date Published
01/2016
ISSN
1723-2007
URL
http://doi.org/10.2450/2015.0072-15
DOI
10.2450/2015.0072-15
PMID
PMC4731344